Jo Victoria’s art practice explores ideas of place and focuses on the influence of living close to the ocean. Unglazed porcelain captures an essential quality of this experience. The whiteness and translucency of this material produces similar qualities to bleached bones, fossils and broken shells found on the beaches and rock platforms on the ocean’s edge. Porcelain sculptural works feel fossil like in the way that they capture the life essence of once living things in this environment.

Jo uses light in her work to portray a sense of ephemerality. The way light interacts with the materiality of porcelain enhances ideas of fragility, strength and the influences of deep time. She has also developed a series of glassy glazes that create a sense of watery ocean light in the works. A natural extension of her practice is to introduce glass as a material that references and deepens the experience of these ideas. In these new works Jo aimed to mix porcelain and glass to bring another dimension to her work where light transfers, intersects and interrupts relationships between the forms to create an immersive experience.

 


Image: Jo Victoria, 'Catastrophic', 2020, burnt and charred porcelain bones, threaded on burnt copper wire.